: - ) ALL Who is Dale Cooper, really?

Dom

White Lodge
Jul 10, 2022
811
783
We still don’t know what the last missing page from Lauras diary says. That could be the key for Cooper escaping maybe? Cause in season 1 or fire walk with me they explicitly say there were 4 pages missing and we got to see 3 in season 3. There must be a reason why that 4th page is still missing? Maybe Laura had a dream about Carrie from the future and was told to write about it in her Diary? Maybe about Richard?
Ten years from now we get a limited series for octogenarian David Lynch called Twin Peaks: The Final Page. You read it here first!! :D:D

I don't know if anyone here ever saw an old British sci-fi/horror series called Sapphire and Steel, but Richard/Coop and Carrie/Laura reminded me of them in the last part of The Return.

Coop's meeting with the Fireman seemed more like James Bond meeting M and getting an assignment than a prisoner of the Lodge for decades getting to escape. It makes me question whether Coop was actually some sort of identity Kyle Maclachlan's character took on (and was given a manufactured history) in the Twin Peaks reality, rather than someone entirely 'real': that he was really some sort of agent working for the Fireman and Señorita Dido all along.
 

Dom

White Lodge
Jul 10, 2022
811
783
Just thought of an addendum: the one flashback we do get from Mr. C is to his own scenes; laughing with BOB, and striking the mirror head-on. I find it enticing as evidence that we don't see him flashback to a scene that was only Cooper.

Your line of thought is intriguing; highlighting this one bit because it dawned on me that the Arm, a being made from a cast-off appendage, lends well to the idea that Mr. C is a composite of some kind. All the elements of how Earle's demise was shown and discussed are in pretty specific terms; a fire pillar akin to an (al)chemical reaction, maybe something like a reverse crucible, and BOB saying he "took" but did not destroy his soul.
Yeah, I mean, if you view the soul as a lifeforce separate from thoughts and memories, maybe Mr C's soul is Earle's and the personality the darker side of Cooper, with BOB enslaved to make him more powerful. Imagine that instead of a case of straightforward demonic possession, where the demon controls the man, we have a being so evil that it possesses the demon and controls its power. Mr C's eyes were white in the Lodge, so the same as the other shadow beings. In the real world, they've turned black. It looks like Mr C is slowly mutating into something inhuman (vomiting highly toxic slime). Maybe he needs to be put inside one of those kettles.

When Mr C awakens in the Great Northern, he looks in the mirror at Coop's face and headbutts the mirror. Why, because he's someone who hates Cooper (as Earle did and wants to hurt him.) Then he goes to the hospital to harm Audrey, because Coop cared about her. Also, in an echo of Windom Earle, the last time we see Mr C, he's surrounded by flames in the Waiting Room.
 
Last edited:

Ekorren

Sparkwood & 21
May 13, 2024
13
23
Had some stray thoughts the other day. These days knowing of their intent I'm 97% sure the writers absolutely did not intend for any kind of Lodge Bureau of Investigation sort of deal, but if you just take the story at face value, some of Cooper's behavior in S3E17 is really damn weird.

I've already mentioned him being rather unbothered by things upon waking up, but also... wtf is up with the "I am the FBI!" thing? Consider how effing weird that line is if you're just a special agent coming off of a colossal failure. Why are you suddenly the FBI, Cooper? You're not even running the thing, Gordon's your director, there's Denise also. You've been gone for damn near 25 years! What's going on here?

Presumably he was able to observe current events (maybe that's who all that TV static in FWWM was for) while in the Lodge but I think that'd bother most people a lot more than it appeared to bother him. Did Cooper unofficially take over the FBI while in the Black Lodge? Maybe Jeffries helped? Mike's also helping him even after Mr. C has been captured. That's some networking skills. Did Cooper just chill there (we know he also lost no muscle mass) and talk to lots of people and make 247 plans while being presumably trapped? That makes even less sense.
 

Dom

White Lodge
Jul 10, 2022
811
783
Had some stray thoughts the other day. These days knowing of their intent I'm 97% sure the writers absolutely did not intend for any kind of Lodge Bureau of Investigation sort of deal, but if you just take the story at face value, some of Cooper's behavior in S3E17 is really damn weird.
That's putting it mildly! :D It makes me wonder if the real Coop was lurking on the astral plane the whole time, watching the TV show at the same time we were! Meanwhile the 'Dougie' incarnation was a sort of incomplete copy of him. Where did Coop's body come from, incidentally? Supposedly, Mr C had Coop's body. In that case, did Coop regain his own body when Mr C was sent back to the Lodge.

I've already mentioned him being rather unbothered by things upon waking up, but also... wtf is up with the "I am the FBI!" thing? Consider how effing weird that line is if you're just a special agent coming off of a colossal failure. Why are you suddenly the FBI, Cooper? You're not even running the thing, Gordon's your director, there's Denise also. You've been gone for damn near 25 years! What's going on here?
I think it was that he was a physical incarnation of everything great about the FBI! He was James Stewart from The FBI Story. I took it in the same light as someone saying 'Call the police!' and a policeman turning around and saying 'I am the police!'

Presumably he was able to observe current events (maybe that's who all that TV static in FWWM was for) while in the Lodge but I think that'd bother most people a lot more than it appeared to bother him.
As I say, we knew Coop was psychic (possibly because his presence in the waiting room rippled back through the timeline.) Gordon is also psychic, so one wonders if he ends up in the Lodges at some point. We see the hooded Dweller on the Threshold in the TV show. Was that the being that became Mr C or was that Coop himself?

Did Cooper unofficially take over the FBI while in the Black Lodge? Maybe Jeffries helped? Mike's also helping him even after Mr. C has been captured. That's some networking skills. Did Cooper just chill there (we know he also lost no muscle mass) and talk to lots of people and make 247 plans while being presumably trapped? That makes even less sense.
Coop ends up back in the Twin Peaks world in a new body. He seems to be very well aware of everything that's happening. His black-and-white meeting with the Fireman seems to be nothing out of the ordinary for him (akin to Bond meeting M), his clothing has changed since the final episode of season two, his hairstyle is different. He's visibly 25 years older and seems extremely relaxed about time travel and visiting parallel universes.

To me, it implies Coop hasn't been chilling out doing nothing for 25 years: possibly he's been in other realities under other identities, but unable to access the Twin Peaks reality because of his double being there. Heck, maybe Coop and Diane were Jeffrey Beaumont and Sandy Williams in Lumberton at some point in their adventures?!!

We see the waiting room. Waiting room for what? Was it like a railway station with different 'trains' taking you to different worlds? When Mike talks to Coop at the start of season three, the implication is that Coop hasn't been there for a long time. Why would the Evolution of the Arm require explanation if Coop had been there the whole time? If the Little Man had changed abruptly, it would have been the 'Transformation of the Arm.' The implication is that the Little Man transformed over time while Coop was somewhere else.

There are a lot of questions. Season three feels like it could actually be season 27 of Twin Peaks and that we've missed a huge amount in the meantime (imagine jumping from, say, season two of ER to season 15 and how disorientating that would be: new sets, new characters, loads of backstory to the few remaining season two regulars you'd have to figure out.) The characters we encounter in the Roadhouse, for example, are never given much introduction. Are these 'series regulars' that someone who had seen the previous (hypothetical) 25 seasons would know and there would be no introduction needed?

Moreover, Harry's absence sticks out. I know there's a real world explanation and Robert Forster is a great actor, but - and I've said this before - it's like Holmes coming back in The Empty House and partnering up with John Watson's brother. Rod Serling's obsession in The Twilight Zone and Night Gallery was 'you can't go home again.' He wrote numerous stories involving people wanting to return to the security of childhood and youth only to find it's gone. Intentionally or not, Harry no longer being in evidence in the town changes the feel of Coop's return. The world had moved on in his absence and the reunion with his old friends isn't the warm, cosy one we'd anticipated: there's a stranger at the Sheriff's desk.

After the failure of that reunion, Coop no longer has any qualms about erasing the history of his time in Twin Peaks and moving on. Clearly this is a man who has done these things before. He's like a gunslinger who rides into town, takes care of business and rides back out into the desert.
 

Ekorren

Sparkwood & 21
May 13, 2024
13
23
It makes me wonder if the real Coop was lurking on the astral plane the whole time, watching the TV show at the same time we were!
We've gotten the TV static, and we've seen screens in the Fireman's, I'm willing to bet the Arm spends a lot of time watching the TV show, at least. Cooper I think may have a limited view... mostly I think this due to the Mr. C liability. But if we go a layer up, if we say "Kyle", not Cooper, then that's not an issue. Mr. C knows nothing of "Kyle". So perhaps "Kyle" does, in fact, watch as well as influence the TV show.

"Kyle" "dreams", and Cooper then lives inside those dreams. "Lynch" and Gordon I'd expect to have a similar sort of deal.
Where did Coop's body come from, incidentally?
Dunno about bodies. The "physicality" aspect of the Lodges and the like was always confusing to me. Some entities seem ancient, but some bodies age. With the proliferation of tulpas it doesn't seem that hard for them to create a body. A mind, or, for lack of a better word, a soul, seems to cause them greater issues. But the way I saw it, Cooper and Mr. C had their individual bodies, so Cooper just held on to his when he came to the Black Lodge.
We see the hooded Dweller on the Threshold in the TV show.
Ngl I completely forgot about this guy. I always thought the Dweller on the Threshold was explicitly a given person's shadow relative to them and nothing else, but I can see the Dweller being a general entity in charge of that process.
I took it in the same light as someone saying 'Call the police!' and a policeman turning around and saying 'I am the police!'
Yeah that makes sense, I might be reading too much into it now that you bring up that example. "The FBI looking for me is not a problem, I am it."
We see the waiting room. Waiting room for what? Was it like a railway station with different 'trains' taking you to different worlds?
The red curtains always makes me think of a stage. I see it as a theater waiting room, before people go to play their respective roles in whatever show that's about to come on. So it works well with your theory and mine. Makes sense that entities stay behind and watch, and also interfere. That's my explanation for what "let's rock!" means, as the whole thing gives me "the show must go on" vibes. I see the Arm as a stage manager, he ferries people around, "is this the story about the little girl who lives down the lane?" When Cooper is really bored I guess he's back to riding worms or overseeing a vault.

There was a movie that dealt with the concept of external actors staging events and also interfering with them to move them to certain conclusions, and like Twin Peaks is a subversion of TV shows, that movie was a subversion of horror movies. It's more explicit but that's pretty much how I see the waiting room / lodge.
There are a lot of questions. Season three feels like it could actually be season 27 of Twin Peaks and that we've missed a huge amount in the meantime
That's very much how S3 felt for me in general. The fools at ABC wouldn't let us have more seasons of the glorious show! But they still happened. So I'd say that checks out. It'd greatly explain Cooper feeling so alien and unfamiliar. Man's been busy and we never knew him in the first place.

Another thing is some of those random time discontinuities. Maybe it's just errors but so many dates seemed off, and Mr. C saying he's 25 years Richard's senior, like the whole thing was shifted off to a different cycle with different dates and stuff. Judy went from being a random woman in Buenos Aires to an... entity. The Woodsmen are covered in ash. Annie's forgotten. It's all sorts of wrong. Who's Billy, yeah.
After the failure of that reunion, Coop no longer has any qualms about erasing the history of his time in Twin Peaks and moving on. Clearly this is a man who has done these things before. He's like a gunslinger who rides into town, takes care of business and rides back out into the desert.
And the whole thing seems to have been degenerating and rotting anyway. Mr. C'/Bob's running around appears to have caused loads of damage, and Cooper would rather see his former friends in another place once he got rid of Bob. Log Lady feels like the world is dying, I am not sure if that's a general statement or she knows Cooper's about to erase it all.

So question, how do you reconcile all this with what appears to be the writers' intent that Cooper "messed with things he shouldn't" and that he failed (in some way)? Similarly Fireman's "you are far away".

I feel like the backstage astral plane managing things and Cooper (or w/e name you give him) being aware and on that level makes a concerning amount of sense, seems hinted at all over the place, would provide for some of the more cohesive explanations of the whole thing... but seems completely incompatible with that message. I'm at a loss there.
 

Dom

White Lodge
Jul 10, 2022
811
783
The red curtains always makes me think of a stage. I see it as a theater waiting room, before people go to play their respective roles in whatever show that's about to come on. So it works well with your theory and mine. Makes sense that entities stay behind and watch, and also interfere. That's my explanation for what "let's rock!" means, as the whole thing gives me "the show must go on" vibes. I see the Arm as a stage manager, he ferries people around, "is this the story about the little girl who lives down the lane?" When Cooper is really bored I guess he's back to riding worms or overseeing a vault.
Yes, that's a really interesting idea, given we see the Fireman and Señorita Dido in the same theatre that appears in Mulholland Dr. And, of course, Inland Empire has a lot of weird behind the scenes/backstage material.

That's very much how S3 felt for me in general. The fools at ABC wouldn't let us have more seasons of the glorious show! But they still happened. So I'd say that checks out. It'd greatly explain Cooper feeling so alien and unfamiliar. Man's been busy and we never knew him in the first place.

When you think about it, beyond the small amount we're told on screen, Coop is an enigma. We never see him get sent to Twin Peaks. He suddenly appears in his car addressing Diane. We're told about Windom and Caroline and given hints about Coop's travels in his mind, but the majority of Coop's backstory comes from My Life, My Tapes, which is of questionable canonicity. It could be yet another timeline where Coop, rather than Desmond, handles the Teresa Banks case. The most we know of Coop pre-series is his short role in FWWM. I still wish Kyle had played Coop in those Chester Desmond scenes in FWWM, although I love Chris Isaak as Desmond.

I can't help but wonder if Mr C has some control over spacetime and has warped reality wherever he's been.

Another thing is some of those random time discontinuities. Maybe it's just errors but so many dates seemed off, and Mr. C saying he's 25 years Richard's senior, like the whole thing was shifted off to a different cycle with different dates and stuff. Judy went from being a random woman in Buenos Aires to an... entity. The Woodsmen are covered in ash. Annie's forgotten. It's all sorts of wrong. Who's Billy, yeah.
Yeah, things felt out of kilter in Twin Peaks, the town, from the moment Coop, Earle and Annie went behind the curtains. It's like Coop entered his personal Heart of Darkness. The next 25 years were a journey upriver to face his own Kurtz. Annie's absence actually seems important to me - that she's a key to everything that has been overlooked. The one woman with a sense of what happened and she's dismissed as essentially 'some girl who went into that place' and never contacted for any insight into what happened with her then-lover and Windom Earle, who is also never mentioned. It's an almost wilful blindness or one that has been cast on the characters so they won't figure out what is happening.

And the whole thing seems to have been degenerating and rotting anyway. Mr. C'/Bob's running around appears to have caused loads of damage, and Cooper would rather see his former friends in another place once he got rid of Bob. Log Lady feels like the world is dying, I am not sure if that's a general statement or she knows Cooper's about to erase it all.
Yes, there was a sense of entropy about the town, that things weren't as they should be. Several characters seemed to be frozen in time - Andy, Lucy and Hawk and Norma, Ed and Nadine, for example. It was as if their story stopped at the end of season two and restarted in season three. There had to be a Sheriff Truman in the town and when he went away, another one replaced him. It's as if the only way the town could start functioning again was to have Laura's death erased.

So question, how do you reconcile all this with what appears to be the writers' intent that Cooper "messed with things he shouldn't" and that he failed (in some way)? Similarly Fireman's "you are far away".
Yeah, I don't see it that way. I've said before that the last part of season three feels like the first part of season four. Sure altering history has consequences, but 'Richard and Linda, two birds with one stone' is followed by Coop saying 'I understand.' Coop being 'far away' says to me he's moving to another reality. My view is that the Lodges have been invaded and 'Richard and Linda' is his assignment. So season three ends with Coop and Carrie (and Diane/Linda in absentia) on a new mission to defeat the entity that has invaded the Lodges, which might well be at the root of all the reality 'errors' in the series.

I know there was a certain authorial intent, but with David Lynch being a very instinctive director, meanings can change from the script based on how he subsequently writes the scene and the viewer is required to ask new questions rather than seek answers.

I feel like the backstage astral plane managing things and Cooper (or w/e name you give him) being aware and on that level makes a concerning amount of sense, seems hinted at all over the place, would provide for some of the more cohesive explanations of the whole thing... but seems completely incompatible with that message. I'm at a loss there.
It depends on where those scenes with Coop and the Fireman are in the timeline. Is the conversation much later on in the timeline, perhaps after the events of the Odessaverse, going on another mission? Coop 'understands' the Fireman's remark about Richard and Linda in the conversation, but seems confused by the letter from Linda to Richard when he's in the Odessaverse. As an offcuff thought, Odessa is also a historical oil producing city, so there's plenty of scorched engine oil available.
 
Last edited:

Mr. Reindeer

White Lodge
Apr 13, 2022
819
1,854
Unless part of Coop's memory was somehow blocked off. 'A page from his diary' was missing? ;) Certainly the forces we're dealing with have shown themselves capable of blocking off memories. We still don't know what happened to Major Briggs when he disappeared. When he returned, his clothes had changed, as if he'd been sent somewhere else (the 'Odessaverse'? Another reality?) before being returned.
I wonder if this is part of the reason that the Giant/Fireman has to speak to Cooper in cryptic clues. Perhaps there are some phrases that will resonate/unlock memories in Cooper Prime but can bypass the Doppelgänger’s awareness.
 

Dom

White Lodge
Jul 10, 2022
811
783
I wonder if this is part of the reason that the Giant/Fireman has to speak to Cooper in cryptic clues. Perhaps there are some phrases that will resonate/unlock memories in Cooper Prime but can bypass the Doppelgänger’s awareness.
Yes, although (assuming the Giant from season two is the same guy as the Fireman) using riddles seems to be the standard method with the character. People often remember the scene when Coop first meets the Giant in the first episode of season two, but there's a scene at the end which is interesting when the Giant gives Coop more advice.



This time, the Giant cautions patience working things out. He also mentions stones, this time to build a path. Then he tells Coop the 'forgot something.' I always assumed he meant Audrey, but firing the glowing energy into Coop's head was interesting, reminiscent of the golden light in the theatre when the Fireman is with Señorita Dido. Could there have been more to it?

Season three does, after all, recontextualise a lot of what we saw in the past.
 

Ekorren

Sparkwood & 21
May 13, 2024
13
23
I wonder if this is part of the reason that the Giant/Fireman has to speak to Cooper in cryptic clues. Perhaps there are some phrases that will resonate/unlock memories in Cooper Prime but can bypass the Doppelgänger’s awareness.
It'd make so much sense with all cagey approaches some entities had. It could be methods to inject external information into the dream without alerting the wrong parties. Same with Jeffries.

The Giant in S2 has such peculiar dialogue though.

"Think of me as a friend." "The question is, where have you gone?" "This is all I'm permitted to say." "We want to help you." Who's we, and permitted by whom? "Permitted" has a weird air to it.

Interestingly, the Giant seemed to be trying to tell Dale that he shouldn't want to make Annie participate in the Miss Twin Peaks context. Seems preventing that might have been possible, but not in a forceful way. Maybe it's just Annie they were trying to keep out of harm's way? The S3 consequences seem so severe they're ready to solve the problem with explicit Deus Ex Machinas. Would the Black Lodge situation still be an accident, or an inevitability? Or a requirement? Is it necessary for Dale to have that experience for secret reasons?

"It all cannot be said aloud now", "It's in our house now", "I'm not gonna talk about Judy", "Whisper" the theme of hiding information is repeated throughout. We also know that something being whispered in Dale's ear doesn't guarantee he immediately remembers it.
 

Tulpa

Bureau HQ
TULPA MOD
ADMIN
Apr 11, 2022
636
1,030
"Whisper"

After much prior thought on this, I’d settled on the assumption this was wasn’t meant to be textual. As if it wasn’t meant to be subtitled and perhaps even not meant to be heard. Didn’t really make sense otherwise. Maybe it’s because any other explanations went too far down too many rabbit holes and blaming oversight was an easier way out.

In the context of these other quotes, however, it takes on a completely different connotation.

No longer does it sound like a placeholder phrase in the absence of what was actually said by Laura. In this context it sounds like an instruction: Whisper, don’t say aloud.

Is she part of the “We?”
 
Last edited:

Dom

White Lodge
Jul 10, 2022
811
783
It'd make so much sense with all cagey approaches some entities had. It could be methods to inject external information into the dream without alerting the wrong parties. Same with Jeffries.

The Giant in S2 has such peculiar dialogue though.

"Think of me as a friend." "The question is, where have you gone?" "This is all I'm permitted to say." "We want to help you." Who's we, and permitted by whom? "Permitted" has a weird air to it.

Interestingly, the Giant seemed to be trying to tell Dale that he shouldn't want to make Annie participate in the Miss Twin Peaks context. Seems preventing that might have been possible, but not in a forceful way. Maybe it's just Annie they were trying to keep out of harm's way? The S3 consequences seem so severe they're ready to solve the problem with explicit Deus Ex Machinas. Would the Black Lodge situation still be an accident, or an inevitability? Or a requirement? Is it necessary for Dale to have that experience for secret reasons?

"It all cannot be said aloud now", "It's in our house now", "I'm not gonna talk about Judy", "Whisper" the theme of hiding information is repeated throughout. We also know that something being whispered in Dale's ear doesn't guarantee he immediately remembers it.
Even in the 'real world', we get...



Characters talk in code, as if there's someone malevolent monitoring everything. Why couldn't Gordon just tell Chester the things Lil demonstrated? After all, Chester tells Sam almost everything.

In essence, it's the behaviour of the Cold War. Clearly Gordon and his Blue Rose team know a lot more than the audience.

Also... does this blue rose have any bearing on things? ;)

 

Mr. Reindeer

White Lodge
Apr 13, 2022
819
1,854
No longer does it sound like a placeholder phrase in the absence of what was actually said by Laura. In this context it sounds like an instruction: Whisper, don’t say aloud.
This has always been my interpretation of it. I don’t think it’s a “placeholder” because it doesn’t occur when she’s actually whispering; it’s beforehand. It’s someone telling her what to do. I think it’s very much meant to evoke a film director giving instructions to an actor, and I strongly suspect that the line is voiced by Lynch himself (sorry, Dom, I know you hate meta). And I don’t think there’s any way the placing of the line could be an error, A) because Lynch is METICULOUS with his audio in particular, and B) because the scene was shot backwards…so how would a forwards-spoken word get on there unless it were very intentional?
 

Tulpa

Bureau HQ
TULPA MOD
ADMIN
Apr 11, 2022
636
1,030
This has always been my interpretation of it. I don’t think it’s a “placeholder” because it doesn’t occur when she’s actually whispering; it’s beforehand. It’s someone telling her what to do. I think it’s very much meant to evoke a film director giving instructions to an actor, and I strongly suspect that the line is voiced by Lynch himself (sorry, Dom, I know you hate meta). And I don’t think there’s any way the placing of the line could be an error, A) because Lynch is METICULOUS with his audio in particular, and B) because the scene was shot backwards…so how would a forwards-spoken word get on there unless it were very intentional?

All good points. It’s been a hot minute since I spent hours one night dissecting that scene. I think at the time I thought it might be a stray accidental pick-up from the set boom mics. Or an errant audio track on the editing deck.

But as you rightly point out, that’s highly unlikely. Mostly because it sounds too polished and “edited”.

Although I must say I find it very peculiar in that it’s an outlier for the series. I don’t remember any other examples of this sort of thing in Twin Peaks. There’s lots of meta but this one feels different somehow.

Fascinating stuff.
 

Dom

White Lodge
Jul 10, 2022
811
783
This has always been my interpretation of it. I don’t think it’s a “placeholder” because it doesn’t occur when she’s actually whispering; it’s beforehand. It’s someone telling her what to do. I think it’s very much meant to evoke a film director giving instructions to an actor, and I strongly suspect that the line is voiced by Lynch himself (sorry, Dom, I know you hate meta). And I don’t think there’s any way the placing of the line could be an error, A) because Lynch is METICULOUS with his audio in particular, and B) because the scene was shot backwards…so how would a forwards-spoken word get on there unless it were very intentional?
Yeah, don't worry about mentioning meta stuff. I know there's obviously some there. The only disagreement I ever have is the extent of it. ;) I don't think 'Whisper!' is meta though. It sounds like a female voice saying 'Whisper' to me. Kyle seems to have been directed to react to the word as well. And, as you say, David Lynch is too obsessed with sound to let a placeholder slide through.

So someone tells Laura to whisper. Cooper reacts to the offscreen order. Laura whispers. Again, this is a rerun of an old scene, but with extra information. Who gives the order? What are we not seeing offscreen?

Once again, we're limited on what information we're given. There are numerous ways younger Sheryl Lee could have been used in that scene with the older Cooper (played by Kyle as he was in 2017). Lynch chose to use Sheryl Lee who had aged.



In the original version of the scene re-enacted at the beginning of season three (minus the jazz music and dancing Dream Man) the Dream Man's cousin says about Laura Palmer 'I feel like I know her, but sometimes by arms bend back.' Cooper (and we) assumed that was a reference to Laura's abduction. Or course the tying up was at Leo and Jacques behest. Everyone concentrated on 'but sometimes by arms bend back,' but actually the 'I feel like I know her' may be the more relevant part.
 

Ekorren

Sparkwood & 21
May 13, 2024
13
23
I assume there's something above the Laura/Fireman (I don't know how they compare) level and that's who the Whisper person is. Could even be Laura's upper form if we already suspect Cooper of having one.
In the original version of the scene re-enacted at the beginning of season three (minus the jazz music and dancing Dream Man) the Dream Man's cousin says about Laura Palmer 'I feel like I know her, but sometimes by arms bend back.' Cooper (and we) assumed that was a reference to Laura's abduction. Or course the tying up was at Leo and Jacques behest. Everyone concentrated on 'but sometimes by arms bend back,' but actually the 'I feel like I know her' may be the more relevant part.
I've always been bothered by this scene on rewatches. Everyone usually tells me her confusion and the cousin thing is about Maddie and I'm just never certain about that one, that's such a minor thing overall. "I feel like I know her" could support the theory that people like Laura and Dale have multiple levels and they're literally just talking about being themselves but a bit hazy about it.

Like my theory that Richard is Cooper but he's not supposed to remember he's Cooper, because that causes some form of dysphoria, and he's struggling to fully fall into the nested dream for whatever reason (also known as Jeffries syndrome, that old statement from MJA would fit).

Perhaps in S4 another agent is asking Richard. "Are you Dale Cooper?" "I think I knew someone like that some once."

And seems directly asking "Who are you?" brings people back to whatever they're currently supposed to identify as.
Although I must say I find it very peculiar in that it’s an outlier for the series. I don’t remember any other examples of this sort of thing in Twin Peaks. There’s lots of meta but this one feels different somehow.
The Great Northern Hotel key fob is the most messed up thing for me as far as meta things go. I'm still not sure if that's supposed to be part of the lore or just a tossed in joke.
 

Mr. Reindeer

White Lodge
Apr 13, 2022
819
1,854
It’s worth noting that “Laura” in the Episode 2 script of the original series is simply called “Beautiful Woman” in the stage directions and dialogue prompts.

I agree that the key fob is really wonky and maybe the most on-the-nose instance of breaking the fourth wall. Still not entirely sure what to make of that.
 
Top